How do you feel about Rewilding?

Many Town, Parish and District Councils around the country are turning to a concept called rewilding, letting some green and grassy areas return to a more natural state.  The aim for many of these Councils is to increase the amount of biodiversity and wildlife locally.

As a District Council, South Hams currently manages about 50 hectares of green space which is cut every couple of weeks.

Today, the Council are launching a consultation to explore what the public thinks about the Council enabling rewilding on a small proportion of this land. (10Ha for a biodiversity led approach, and 3.5Ha for wildflower meadows).

In 2019 South Hams District Council declared a Climate Change and Biodiversity Emergency.

Across the UK, many habitats which are important for supporting wildlife have already been lost. For example, 97% of wildflower meadows have been lost since the 1930s, with a knock on impact on the species which rely on these habitats.

The abundance of habitat specialist butterflies has declined by 68% since 1976 for example.

As part of their declaration and to mitigate against such biodiversity loss, South Hams has said it aims to increase biodiversity on Council owned-land by at least 10% by 2025.

Creating and restoring more biodiverse green spaces and enabling rewilding of some Council owned land, could help the Council reach its biodiversity targets and significantly improve conditions for local wildlife.

This consultation is proposing an approach which could see the Council proactively manage 10Ha land as wilder green space, 3.5Ha of land as wildflower areas, and 3.5Ha of new tree planting. This could support pollinators, as well as wildlife such as reptiles, small mammals, amphibians, birds and even bats.

Cllr Tom Holway, South Hams District Council’s Executive Member for Climate Change, said: “In 2019 we made a very important declaration, namely we declared a climate change and biodiversity emergency.  This means that we made a commitment to proactively do things that could halt the progress of climate change and biodiversity loss.

“This idea of rewilding is a great way for Councils to make a big difference locally.  In reality, South Hams actually owns a small proportion of the green spaces in the District, only around 50 hectares and we are proposing to do this on about 1/3 of that.

“However, I am excited about the difference this could make, and it would be wonderful to get local communities engaged in this process and for them to see these habitats change and grow over the coming year.

“This consultation is all about understanding what the public thinks about this idea and if they would be supportive of it in general terms.”

The Council recognises that some members of our community may be concerned about uncut grasses looking untidy or neglected.

However, the proposals suggest that the areas selected for rewilding would still be carefully managed, often with cut grass framing the area, paths cut through longer grass and clear signposting to show everyone which grassed areas are part of the scheme.

If the consultation returns a favourable response to the concept of rewilding some Council owned land in South Hams, a proposals map will be available in the autumn , and in some cases  there may be more site level consultation over the specific detail of proposals to ensure the approach fits with the aspirations of local residents.

Through this experience and the consultation, South Hams would also be able to support and offer advice to Town and Parish Councils who are also considering allocating space to rewilding.

For more information on the proposal and to have your say visit:

www.engagement.southhams.gov.uk/enhancingbiodiversity

Or to read more about South Hams District Council’s Climate Change Declaration, visit:

www.climatechange.southhams.gov.uk/climate-declaration

Decarbonising Rural Communities and Economies

Rural Services Network

The Rural Services Network have published a report 'Decarbonising Rural Communities and Economies', pointing out some of the particular features of hamlets, villages and isolated dwellings that the government needs to understand and address if the country is to achieve its net carbon zero targets. Look especially at the policy 'asks' at the end that will be needed, and some of the graphs that show how different rural communities tend to be compared to urban ones in a number of important ways. The document below is a multi-page document, please click on the pages to step through.

decarbonising-rural-communities

Environmental tip of the month – Laundry

Though it might seem like a pedestrian chore, doing the laundry has a much bigger impact on the planet than you might think, around 25% of our clothing’s life cycle impact comes from washing and drying. Here in the UK, that equates, on average, to 468 wash cycles per year, for a family of four.

I would like to be able to give some straightforward advice such as:  washing less; washing at lower temperatures; not using the tumble dryer; replacing old, end of life machines with more energy efficient models; and trying to slowly replace our synthetic clothing with natural fibre garments, to reduce the amount of plastic microfibres we are releasing into our waterways, all of which are good and valid points, but I have, however, discovered that it is not quite that simple.

There are indeed some good tips for reducing the amount we wash, the obvious one being to only wash clothes when they are dirty. I, (like many, I’m sure) am guilty of scooping up the family’s washing and bundling it straight into the machine, rather than sorting through to see what may still be clean.  Machine manufacturer AEG estimates that around 90% of the clothes that go through a wash cycle, are in fact not dirty enough to warrant being washed.  We could sponge off little messes, air our clothes on the line after wearing to make them last longer, do a sniff test on tops to see if they could last another day, not worry if we wear something 2 or maybe even 3 (?) days in a row – after all, in reality, how many of us actually do remember what our friend, work colleague or even our family members were wearing yesterday?

We have all been encouraged in recent years to reduce the temperature of our wash cycles to save energy, which does indeed generate significant savings (although we should run a higher temperature wash every now and then, to kill off any accumulated bacteria in the machine). But how many of us realise the water usage implications of those lower temperature washes?  Synthetics and delicates programs and low temperature cotton programs use significantly more water than the higher temperature options.  My 8kg machine will in fact only properly wash 8kg of washing on a cotton setting (the 60 degree option using 55 litres of water, the 40 degree option, 81 litres and very helpfully there is no water usage data for the 20 degree option!).  For any other program you are supposed to reduce the size of the load quite dramatically, the standard synthetics program at 40 degrees, uses 60 litres of water, but for only 4.5kg of clothing. Delicates and even lower temperature wash cycles reduce the recommended load sizes further still. Other brand machines show similar data. There is also sadly, a much more detrimental implication for those low temperature, high water volume wash cycles, that I will come back to.

Most of us know that tumble drying is bad for the environment, it is estimated that around 70% of the energy usage of a wash cycle is attributable to the tumble dryer and a whopping 32% of UK consumers use their tumble dryers even in the summer, when other means of drying should be available. Line drying where possible will always be the best option, but where bad weather scuppers that, a clothes horse or Sheila’s maid (Traditional ceiling pulley rack) are good alternatives.  For those worried about moisture build up in their homes from drying indoors, try running a higher rev spin cycle on your machine to remove as much moisture as possible before putting the washing out to dry, or it has also been suggested that running a dehumidifier at the same time, can be effective.  Whilst not ideal, the energy usage of both options is still significantly less than the usage by a tumble dryer.

Then we get to the topic of ironing, which, quite aside from many finding it both tedious and time consuming, consumes electricity unnecessarily and deteriorates fabric.  Try hanging clothes as soon as the wash cycle has finished, the water still in them will work with gravity to pull most wrinkles out.  For wrinkle prone clothing, cut the final spin cycle,  leaving even more water in the garment, creating more pull.  That is of course, in direct conflict with the suggestion to spin more to avoid tumble drying, I did say at the beginning that this is not simple and I have no solution to offer for those that want to not tumble dry and not iron!

And now to that detrimental bit, I referred to, earlier.  Many of us will have watched with horror, the TV and media coverage showing the release of microplastics (a term coined by Professor Richard Thompson from Plymouth University) from our clothing during the wash cycle, into our waterways.  It is estimated that a city the size of Berlin (3.65 million people in 2019), releases wash related volumes of microfibres equivalent to 500,000 plastic bags every single day (700,000 microfibres per laundry load). Given that 60% of clothing now contains some form of plastic, and that waste treatment plants are not able to filter those particles, those bits of plastic go into our taps and out into the sea.  It is nothing short of an environmental disaster.  Up to 30% of marine plastic pollution could be from tiny particles released by households and businesses, putting marine ecosystems at risk, clogging intestinal tracts, suppressing hunger by making organisms feel full, causing infertility and irreversibly damaging corals.

Research has been ongoing with some recent surprising results.  Previous assumptions were based around agitation in a wash cycle being responsible for the release of these fibres, cotton cycles typically using higher temperatures, less water and more agitation, synthetics, lower temperatures, more water and less agitation. The University of Newcastle has found that delicate wash cycles (which use about twice as much water as other settings) release on average, 800,000 more plastic microfibres than lower water settings. Somewhat ironically, the high volume of water, which is supposed to protect sensitive clothing from damage, actually “plucks” away more fibres from the material.

What can we do?   It would not necessarily be eco-friendly or practical to replace all synthetic clothing with natural materials, but please, wherever possible, if, and when you do buy new clothes, consider whether there is a natural alternative you could buy instead.  It will not stop the release of microfibres from our laundry, but at least the natural ones will biodegrade over time, the plastic ones will not.  Other suggestions include:  washing synthetics less often, with colder wash settings and for a shorter duration - for many of us that may involve consulting the datasheets for our machines to find the most suitable setting (most are available on-line if you no longer have a paper copy); fill your washing machine, rather than the smaller loads recommended by the washing machine manufacturers, for those colder settings.   Consider buying a Guppy friend wash bag or Cora Ball. A Cora Ball is made from 100% diverted and recyclable materials and catches around 26% of fibres that would otherwise be washed down the drain.  A Guppyfriend catches more fibres, but it is a bag and can only hold a certain number of items.  This doesn’t of course solve the problem of microplastics, as you are still left with a blob of fibres that need go in your black bin and which will not biodegrade, but better there, than in our waterways.  Neither device is cheap – around £25-£30 a piece and I cannot currently vouch for their actual effectiveness.

So, in summary, the suggestions for reducing your environmental impact will depend upon your own individual targets.  Having done this research, mine will be to reduce water usage and the release of microplastics; for others, it may be to stop using a tumble dryer.   The only clear-cut message that we can all take, whatever target we set ourselves, is that the most effective way to reach any of them, is purely and simply, to wash less.

Caroline Howarth, Holbeton PC Climate Emergency Subcommittee

 

Holbeton News Update

April

The new wildflower area opposite the Reading Rooms, is now ready to sow with cornfield annuals and a butterfly and bee mix, with yellow rattle to help suppress grasses (it may already have been sown).

The first books for the parish environmental library have been bought second hand or donated:

  • A Life on Our Planet: My Witness Statement and a Vision for the Future, David Attenborough
  • A sting in the tale, Dave Goulson
  • Bringing Back The Beaver, Derek Gow
  • The garden jungle, Dave Goulson*
  • Nature Cure, Richard Mabey
  • Plants with a purpose, Richard Mabey
  • Food for Free, Richard Mabey
  • Flora Britannica, Richard Mabey
  • Feral, George Monbiot
  • Hope in Hell: A decade to confront the climate emergency, Jonathon Porritt
  • No One Is Too Small to Make a Difference, Greta Thunberg
  • Holloway, Robert MacFarlane
  • The Lost Words, Robert MacFarlane
  • The old ways, Robert MacFarlane
  • The wild places, Robert MacFarlane
  • Landmarks, Robert MacFarlane
  • Underland, Robert MacFarlane
  • The Shepherd's Life, James Rebanks
  • English Pastoral, James Rebanks
  • Rewild Yourself Pa, Simon Barnes
  • The Living Mountain, Nan Shepherd
  • There Is No Planet B: A Handbook for the Make or Break Years, Mike Berners-Lee
  • The Well Gardened Mind: Rediscovering Nature in the Modern World, Sue Stuart-Smith
  • Discovering Hedgerows, David Streeter & Rosamund Richardson
  • Wilding, Isabella Tree

*this is a practical guide to re-wilding your garden and complements the tip of the month.

These will ultimately be housed in the Reading Rooms for loan, free to parishioners. Meantime I am holding these books ready to be borrowed. Do get in touch and I will get your choice(s) to you!

We are supporting the Holbeton Cricket Club in their bid to use solar power instead of Calor gas for brewing teas in the pavilion at Flete.

A carbon footprint tool for parishes, developed by two groups at Exeter and Bristol universities, has now been launched, and is free to use. Do have a look (https://impact-tool.org.uk/).

Please let me know (contact details below) of any sightings of early purple orchids in April and May along the roadside in the Parish. We are collecting all the known locations to help ensure they are not disturbed.

Holbeton Climate Change and Eco Group Facebook Page is the place to share ideas and tips for making our parish a greener place! Please do join in and share your thoughts and ideas.

JOIN the Holbeton Climate Change Forum! This is an informal group interested in projects and ideas to support the environment. Members can suggest projects and also volunteer to be part of initiatives. It is open to everyone of whatever age. If you are interested in being part of the forum please contact  annawest123@gmail.com.

To find our Environmental Action Plan, simply Google ‘Holbeton Parish Council’, access the Climate Emergency page, scroll down and open the pdf file called “Action Plan v3”.

Look out for the Environmental Tip of the Month, this month on ‘give pollinators a chance and let your lawn grow!’

Harry Baumer, 830274, harryluson@gmail.com

Holbeton News Update

March

Join us at the Yealm Community Energy meeting to learn all about this ground breaking project, open to all.

It is at 7pm on Tuesday the 23rd of March.

Those at the heart of this project will be explaining how it started and how it works, with plenty of time for questions and answers.

To book your place at this zoom meeting please contact Andrew Hollett, either by email at andrew.hollett@btinternet.com or by phone on 01752 830361.

The Holbeton Bird Box Project is supported by the parish council. See Joe Clarke’s separate article in this month’s Holbeton News. Do join the volunteers assembling the boxes ready to put up around the parish. Contact Joe on 07887730341 or joeclarke1988@gmail.com.

The new wildflower area opposite the Reading Rooms, is now being carefully prepared for seeding, followed by sowing the wild flower mix this month.

Holbeton Climate Change and Eco Group Facebook page is up and running. It is the place to share ideas and tips for making our parish a greener place! Please do join in and share your ideas and thoughts.

JOIN the Holbeton Climate Change Forum! This is an informal group interested in projects and ideas to support the environment. Members can suggest projects and also volunteer to be part of initiatives. It is open to everyone of whatever age. If you are interested in being part of the forum please contact  annawest123@gmail.com.

To find our Environmental Action Plan, simply Google ‘Holbeton Parish Council’, access the Climate Emergency page, scroll down and open the pdf file called “Action Plan v3”. Whilst doing so why not browse the page and see what else is posted there.

Look out for the Environmental Tip of the Month, this month on how to access free local impartial energy advice, courtesy of South Devon Community Energy.

Harry Baumer, 830274, harryluson@gmail.com

Holbeton News Update

February

A new Facebook page has been created, the Holbeton Climate Change and Eco Group. If not already up and running by the time this is published, it will very shortly be live. It is a place for people to share ideas and tips for making our parish a greener place! Please do join and share your ideas and thoughts.

A new wildflower area opposite the Reading Rooms. Subject to PCC approval work on preparing the ground for this should start in February, followed by sowing the wild flower mix. The row of daffodils coming through will be left undisturbed. It will then take a month or two for the area to start to come to life.

Yealm Community Energy. A number of people have said they would like to learn more about this great local development. We now have a date for a virtual meeting, open to all, at 7pm on Tuesday the 23rd of March. Save the date. Those at the heart of this project will be explaining how it started and how it works, with plenty of time for questions and answers. Andrew Hollett will be making the registration arrangements for this event.

The Interim Carbon Plan has been published by the Devon Climate Emergency (DCE) partnership of Devon County Council, with a view to seeking views on their proposals with a detailed questionnaire. These outline some of the transformational changes which are required to create a thriving net-zero Devon. Holbeton Parish Council has already prepared its response. The consultation is open until the 18th February and can be found on their website: https://www.devonclimateemergency.org.uk/INTERIMCARBONPLAN/. In addition catch up on any of the webinars on You Tube by Googling “Devon Carbon Emergency webinars”.

JOIN the Holbeton Climate Change Forum! This is an informal group interested in projects and ideas to support the environment. Members can suggest projects and also volunteer to be part of initiatives. It is open to everyone of whatever age. If you are interested in being part of the forum please contact  annawest123@gmail.com.

To find our Environmental Action Plan, simply access the parish council climate emergency webpage: https://www.holbeton-pc.gov.uk/climate-emergency/, scroll down the page and open the pdf file called “Action Plan v3”. Whilst doing so why not browse the page and see what else is posted there.

Look out for the Environmental Tip of the Month, this month on mending, especially clothes.

Harry Baumer, 830274, harryluson@gmail.com

 

Holbeton News Update

January

Our section 106 money (around £3,500 each year) from Creacombe Solar Farm is on its way. This will be ring fenced to support the parish council’s environmental action plan.

Books on the environment and climate change have been given the green light by the parish council. These will be available to borrow early in 2021. The list was largely put together by the climate change forum (see below). Several books have been donated and the purchase of over 30 books will be funded by the section 106 fund. A list of books will be posted on the climate emergency webpage. Watch this space for updates.

A wildflower area is planned next to the Reading Rooms. A space is to be sown around the end of February. The land is owned by the Church and we have their approval subject to seeing details of the proposal.

Electric car charge point. Holbeton is one of 37 villages in Devon that have been chosen to have a public electric car charge point installed. The proposal is to have this installed in the village hall car park, with the support in principle of the Trustees. The charger will be 22 kilowatts, and available both for residents and visitors. More details in due course.

Yealm Community Energy. A number of people have said they would like to learn more about this local development. We will be holding a virtual meeting, open to all, sometime in the coming months. Watch this space.

The Green Homes Grant has been extended for another year, up to the end of March 2022. The money can be used for various home insulation measures and for installing a heat pump or biomass boiler. For those undertaking either of these measures there are a range of ‘secondary’ measures that can also be included in the grant.

The grant will pay for 2/3rds of the cost of the work, up to a maximum of £5,000, or 100% of the cost up to £10,000 if someone in the household receives certain benefits. Only a very limited range of installers may do the work (the nearest for loft insulation is 6 miles away). You have to apply for the grant in advance and get the work done within 3 months of receiving the government voucher. To access the website with more information you should Google “green homes grant campaign”.

The Interim Carbon Plan has been published by the Devon Climate Emergency (DCE) partnership of Devon County Council, with a view to seeking views on their proposals with a detailed questionnaire. These outline some of the transformational changes which are required to create a thriving net-zero Devon. The consultation is open until February and can be found on their website: https://www.devonclimateemergency.org.uk/INTERIMCARBONPLAN/

Holbeton Parish Council’s Climate Change sub-committee will be considering the plan at its next meeting, and parishioners are encouraged to have a look at the plan, attend any of the webinars, and give their opinions directly to the DCE, or to myself or via the forum (see below).

JOIN the Holbeton Climate Change Forum! This is an informal group interested in projects and ideas to support the environment. Members can suggest projects and also volunteer to be part of initiatives. It is open to everyone of whatever age. If you are interested in being part of the forum please contact  annawest123@gmail.com.

To find our Environmental Action Plan, simply access the parish council climate emergency webpage: https://www.holbeton-pc.gov.uk/climate-emergency/, scroll down the page and open the pdf file called “Action Plan v3”. Whilst doing so why not browse the page and see what else is posted there.

Look out for our Environmental Tip of the Month, this and coming months on how to reduce your electricity costs.

Harry Baumer, 830274, harryluson@gmail.com

PS: non-recyclable wrapping paper now goes to the Plymouth incinerator, not to landfill as stated in last month’s environmental tip of the month.

SHDC – ‘Super-fast’ Electric Vehicle chargers unveiled for public use

Cutting-edge ‘rapid’ Electric Vehicle (EV) charge points have now been commissioned for public use at three council car parks in South Hams and Teignbridge.

From this week EV users can charge their electric vehicles at Ivybridge’s Glanvilles Mill car park, the Chudleigh Library car park and at Buckfastleigh’s Mardle Way car park. The £175,000 project is a partnership of Devon County Council (DCC), South Hams District Council and Teignbridge District Council has been made possible by funding from Highways England.  The ‘rapid’ charge points are among the fastest chargers available - EVs should have an 80 per cent charge within 30 minutes, and will be operated by SWARCO and compatible with all EVs currently on the market.

This scheme is the latest example of Highways England’s Designated Funding programme assisting local authorities to improve air quality across the country, helping DCC and district councils to work together to deliver EV charging points along the A38 in Devon. Currently DCC and the district councils are working to deliver the government-funded Deletti project, the first phase of which aims to deliver at least 25 charging points in public carparks across the county from early next year. And DCC is working with the private sector on the government-funded ‘Street Hubz’ project which aims to deliver at least 100 on-street EV charging points in Exeter from next year.

All three projects are part of local authority efforts to help reduce carbon emissions in Devon. Last year DCC declared a ‘climate emergency’ and formed the Devon Climate Emergency Response Group (DCERG). The DCERG is a group of 25 influential business groups, public sector bodies and councils - including South Hams District Council, Devon County Council and Teignbridge District Council. They are working together to reduce carbon emissions and create a Devon Carbon Plan – a road map to carbon neutrality.

South Hams District Council’s Portfolio Holder for the Environment, Cllr Keith Baldry, said: “It’s really important to us to deliver as many electric vehicle charging points across the District as quickly as we can. The charging points in Ivybridge are a good starting point towards us reducing our carbon footprint. They are perfect for the town but also for travellers on the nearby A38 corridor. We are committed to our Climate Change and Biodiversity Plan and have already started to change over some of our fleet to electric vehicles.”

Councillor Stuart Hughes, Devon County Council’s Cabinet Member for Highways Management, said: “I recognise the difficulty in encouraging more people to use electric cars until there are more charging points and that’s why we are working closely with our district and government partners to deliver charge points in prime locations such as this.

“While the government has committed to banning the sale of all new petrol and diesel cars and vans from 2040, we want more people to start using electric vehicles long before that. Fewer petrol and diesel cars will lead to a reduction in emissions, cleaner air and an improved quality of life for all residents.”

Highways England Project Sponsor Brian Cull said: “We’re pleased to be working with councils across the country to make more provision for drivers making the switch to electric, and over 95% of England’s motorways and major A-roads are now within 20 miles of an electric vehicle charging point.

“The charging points will help drivers of electric vehicles make longer, cleaner journeys and reduce the anxiety of potentially running out of power.

“Elsewhere in the South West, we have already funded charging points along the A303 in Somerset, and this is another example of how we are using designated funding to benefit the environment and communities alongside our roads, as well as the people travelling and working on them.”

Councillor Jackie Hook, Teignbridge District Council’s Executive Member for Climate Change, said: “These two EV charging sites in Teignbridge mark a major milestone in our commitment to move to a more sustainable mode of transport, and we’re grateful to our partners at Devon County Council and Highways England for their contribution to this. Use of electric vehicles will be part of the solution to a cleaner, greener and more sustainable future, alongside increased use of cycling and walking, and better public transport links. We want to promote the use of all these modes of transport through improved facilities and increased safety, to give our residents more ways to reduce their carbon footprint.”

District Council’s Hopes For Improved Home Insulation

As part of its drive to be carbon neutral by 2050, South Hams District Council is recommending committing over £500,000 to improve the energy efficiency of households within the District.

A successful Council bid for The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) funds, through the Green Homes Grant Scheme, has secured over £330,000 to help improve older homes’ energy efficiency as part of a plan to save households money and to cut carbon emissions.

The Council is now proposing to commit a further £200,000 specifically targeted at low-income families living in fuel poverty and to underline its commitment to do it all can to tackle the global climate change and biodiversity challenges.

A Green Homes report going to the Executive Committee, on Thursday 22 October, recommends that whilst the majority of the Council’s reserves are kept under review during the uncertainty around the pandemic, it is prudent to release £20k from the Climate Change and Biodiversity Earmark Reserve. This is to support delivery of these schemes and help some of the most vulnerable in our community.

In line with the Council’s emerging Climate Change and Biodiversity Strategy, the extra funding, if agreed, will also help to reduce carbon emissions from existing housing, which remain a major source of CO2 emissions in the District.

The Green Homes Grant project will focus on the installation of external wall insulation and air source heat pumps for eligible households.

This scheme would mean properties, which are not on the mains gas supply and rely on alternative, less efficient sources of heating, such as oil and solid fuel, would benefit from these improvements early next year.

Whilst the additional funding, if given the green light, will help secure further reductions in fuel poverty and carbon emissions through a range of different interventions and by levering in additional funds.

South Hams District Council’s Leader, Cllr Judy Pearce, said: “I’m delighted that we have been able to secure crucial funds to improve energy efficiency in homes, and to support some of our most vulnerable households while underlining our commitment to the Climate Change and Biodiversity Emergency.

“With recent information forthcoming from Government on local authorities’ funding for the coming year, we are now able to go the extra mile by recommending further funding from our reserves to deliver this vital project and to provide extra officer time in looking at further ways to help carbon reduction.

“This is an important step in reducing the District’s carbon footprint in homes which don't currently benefit from efficient insulation or use inefficient methods of heating.”

A member of South Hams District Council’s Climate Change and Biodiversity Working Group, and Leader of the Council’s Green Party, Cllr Jacqi Hodgson, added: “It is so very important that we tackle this particular carbon issue with these very welcome new funds that have become available to us. It is very timely as the winter chill sets in and we provide a low carbon alternative to turning up carbon heavy thermostats. “Insulating homes and providing more efficient, renewable sources of heating can result in energy savings of between 10 - 30% and the installation of air source heat pumps and external wall and roof insulation will go a long way towards this. I’m very positive that additional resource has been allocated to support this incredibly important work.”

To find out more about the Council’s commitment to the Climate Change and Biodiversity Emergency, visit: www.climatechange.southhams.gov.uk/achievements-and-activityTo find out more about the Green Homes Project and to see if you are eligible, email: eco@swdevon.gov.uk